moresongsaboutbuildings

Happy Birthday Lynda Carter (July 24, 1951)

"Wonder Woman really is a phenomenon unto herself, the show and the character really has a life of its’ own. She represented, uh, hope, I think, for young women, and she also represented for young men, mind you, which I get a lot of mail on, the type of, like the perfect woman, one that could be beautiful and smart and fun and strong."

d20burlesque

Please god let there be video
d20burlesque
:

abbieprime:

So tonight I went out with the knitters to a Whedon-themed burlesque.  There was a Bad Horse and a really awesome Nick Fury (who had an eyepatch pastie and badass dance moves) and the evening was hosted by Dr. Horrible, who has a PhD in horribleness.  So that was great.

…but the Reaver!Zoe act who proceeded to devour her baby is going to give me fucking nightmares forever, jesus christ on a fucking cracker. 

YAY! Glad you enjoyed it! Well, enjoyed and were traumatized by it!

scientificillustration
smithsonianlibraries:

Bats are pollinators too, you know. Pteropus samoensis or Samoan flying fox. illustration by Titian Peale, from John Cassin’s Mammalogy and Ornithology. Atlas (1858) 
From eol.org:

All flying foxes of the genus Pteropus play an important role as pollinators and seed dispersers. Brooke (2001) describes this well: “Particularly on small isolated islands with low biodiversity, flying foxes play an important role in maintaining forests by enabling seed and pollen dispersal. Loss of valuable flying fox populations may have a cascading effect on native forest ecosystems.” Without flying fox species such as P. samoensis the dominant trees of these native forests would have a hard time regenerating and the genetic flow between different populations of each individual tree species would be greatly reduced (Banack, 1998).

smithsonianlibraries:

Bats are pollinators too, you know. Pteropus samoensis or Samoan flying fox. illustration by Titian Peale, from John Cassin’s Mammalogy and Ornithology. Atlas (1858) 

From eol.org:

All flying foxes of the genus Pteropus play an important role as pollinators and seed dispersers. Brooke (2001) describes this well: “Particularly on small isolated islands with low biodiversity, flying foxes play an important role in maintaining forests by enabling seed and pollen dispersal. Loss of valuable flying fox populations may have a cascading effect on native forest ecosystems.” Without flying fox species such as P. samoensis the dominant trees of these native forests would have a hard time regenerating and the genetic flow between different populations of each individual tree species would be greatly reduced (Banack, 1998).